Our group’s exciting contributions at the SfN conference 2023

Our group had an exciting and productive experience at the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) conference in 2023 held this year in Washinton D.C. (USA), presenting two posters that showcase our cutting-edge research on predictive coding mechanisms in the auditory cortex and contextual feedback signals during amodal completion and visual imagery.

Yulia explaining her research on predictive coding mechanisms in the auditory cortex at the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) conference in Washington D.C., drawing interest from an engaged audience member.
Predictive Coding in Auditory Cortex

Work from our MRC-funded project in collaboration with Prof. Peter Uhlhaas’ group at Charit√© Universit√§tsmedizin Berlin (Germany) titled “Investigating Predictive Coding Mechanisms in the Auditory Cortex of Healthy Controls and Schizophrenia Patients Using 7T fMRI” was presented by Yulia Lazarova. This study investigated how our brains build models of the world through making predictions about what should happen next, according to the predictive coding account of brain function. Using high-resolution fMRI techniques, we investigate whether alterations in these mechanisms could be at the origin of symptoms observed in psychosis.

Contextual Feedback Signals during Amodal Completion and Visual Imagery

Yingying Huang presented her work on “Contextual Feedback Signals during Amodal Completion and Visual Imagery in the Early Visual Cortex “. This HBP-funded study aimed to investigate how top-down signals support amodal completion and visual imagery through a human 7T fMRI experiment with natural scene images combined with a visual occlusion paradigm that allows isolating top-down contextual signals in a non-stimulated region of V1 cortex.

Yingying Huang presenting her research on contextual feedback signals in the early visual cortex during amodal completion and visual imagery.

Both posters highlight our group’s commitment to advancing the understanding of brain function and its relationship to cognition, perception, and mental health disorders using state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques at 7T.